Blog

Herb gathering

What’s the best way to get value for money, top quality and no problems with adulteration? Go out and harvest your own herbs. Take a good flora – or better still, go along with someone who knows their herbs – and start to sample the abundance on offer. Now is the time for late flowers like yarrow and mallow, seeds and fruits like fennel and native blueberries, and, of course, the fungi. The best time for the leafy parts of...

Posted by Su Bristow on Fri, 21 Jul 2017

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Herbal first aid

‘My child has earache/stomachache/nettle rash’. ‘I’ve burnt myself/cut myself/pulled a muscle’. These are the sort of first aid issues that people call about; not serious enough to go to the doctor, but needing attention right now. And usually, if you know how to use it, there will be something to hand in your kitchen cupboards or growing nearby. So here are a few of the best h...

Posted by Su Bristow on Fri, 14 Jul 2017

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In praise of chocolate

Back in the 70s, when I first started getting interested in food and nutrition, chocolate was recommended as part of a vegetarian diet because of its high iron content. But apart from that, there wasn’t much good you could say about it; it gave you spots, rotted your teeth, made you fat and/or hyperactive, and was a well-known trigger for migraines. How times change. Recent studies have found that the flavanols in cho...

Posted by Su Bristow on Fri, 7 Jul 2017

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Is organic really better?

This debate will run and run. Where fruit and vegetables are concerned, the consensus seems to be that there is not much difference where nutritional value is concerned. You have to take the broader view: which methods are better for the soil, the local biodiversity, and the planet? Then the answer is obvious. One farmer published a photo of his father ploughing a field fifty years ago, with a cloud of gulls following the plough. The same s...

Posted by Su Bristow on Fri, 30 Jun 2017

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Is organic really better?

This debate will run and run. Where fruit and vegetables are concerned, the consensus seems to be that there is not much difference where nutritional value is concerned. You have to take the broader view: which methods are better for the soil, the local biodiversity, and the planet? Then the answer is obvious. One farmer published a photo of his father ploughing a field fifty years ago, with a cloud of gulls following the plough. The same s...

Posted by Su Bristow on Tue, 27 Jun 2017

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